S8358 Introduced to Amend Workplace Violence Prevention Law

The Workplace Violence Prevention Law requires that covered employers must:

  1. Perform a risk evaluation of the workplace and determine the factors that place employees at risk from occupational assaults and homicide.
  2. Provide employees with information and training on the risks of occupational assaults and homicides in their workplace or workplaces at the time of their initial assignment and annually thereafter.
  3. Establish and implement a system for employees to report incidents of workplace violence.
  4. Develop and maintain a Workplace Violence Incident Report and review the report annually.

Additionally, public employers with twenty or more full-time employees must develop and implement a written Workplace Violence Prevention Program. A written policy statement describing the goals and objectives of the Program must be posted where employee notices are usually posted. The Program must be made available, upon request, to employees, the employees’ designated representatives, and NYSDOL.

All newly covered entities must come into compliance on the following timeline:

  1. The Employer’s Policy Statement must be completed within 30 days of the law going into effect (February 3, 2024).
  2. The Workplace Risk Evaluation and Determination must be completed within 60 days of the law going into effect (March 4, 2024).
  3. The Workplace Violence Prevention Program must be completed within 75 days of the law going into effect (March 19, 2024).
  4. Employers must fully comply with the regulations within 120 days of the law going into effect (May 3, 2024).

Any employee who feels they are experiencing hazardous conditions in the workplace should first provide written notice to a supervisor of the alleged violation and allow reasonable time for correction.

If the matter has not been resolved, employees can file a complaint with the NYSDOL Public Employee Safety & Health Bureau (PESH). Complaints may result in a worksite inspection to determine if the employer has implemented the Workplace Violence Prevention Law requirements. Employers found out of compliance with the law may receive notices of violation. Complaints about public education employers will not be accepted until May 3, 2024, their deadline to come into compliance with the new law.

UPDATE – S8358

On January 22, 2024, New York State Senator Jessica Ramos introduced Senate Bill S8358, which is designed to prevent workplace violence in retail establishments. Titled the “Retail Worker Safety Act,” S8358 would require retail employers in New York to assess workplace violence hazards and develop and implement a comprehensive written workplace violence plan. The law would apply to retail stores. A “retail store” is broadly defined in the legislation as “a store that sells consumer commodities at retail and which is not primarily engaged in the sale of food for consumption on the premises.”

The proposed law would require, among other things, the following:

  • Employers would be required to prepare a written program that includes a list of identified risk factors and methods to prevent violence.
  • Employers would be required to provide training to employees on the risks of workplace violence, including “de-escalation tactics” and “active shooter drills.”
  • Employers would be required to document each incident of workplace violence and report it to a “publicly accessible state database.”
  • Employers with fifty or more retail workers nationwide would be required to install “panic buttons” that immediately dispatch local law enforcement when pressed.
  • Employers experiencing a certain number of violent incidents (to be determined) would be required to employ a security guard during all open hours.

New York’s S8358 is just the most recent example of the growing trend of state laws and regulations designed to require employers to address workplace violence.

DOWLOADABLE TEMPLATES

Public Employer Workplace Violence Prevention Regulations

DOWNLOAD

Public Employer Workplace Violence Prevention Regulations

DOWNLOAD

Workplace Violence Prevention Fact Sheet for Public Employees

DOWNLOAD

Workplace Violence Prevention Fact Sheet for Public Employees

DOWNLOAD

WPV Training for Employer

DOWNLOAD

WPV Training for Employer

DOWNLOAD

WPV Model Training Attachment

DOWNLOAD

WPV Model Training Attachment

DOWNLOAD

WPV Program General Template Attachment

DOWNLOAD

WPV Program General Template Attachment

DOWNLOAD

FAQ

Workplace violence is any physical assault or act of aggressive behavior occurring where a public employee performs any work-related duty in the course of his or her employment, including, but not limited to:

  • An attempt or threat, whether verbal or physical, to inflict physical injury upon an employee;
  • Any intentional display of force which would give an employee reason to fear or expect bodily harm;
  • Intentional and wrongful physical contact with a person without his or her consent that entails some injury; or
  • Stalking an employee with the interest in causing fear of physical harm to the physical safety and health of such employee when such stalking has arisen through and in the course of employment.

In 2006, New York State enacted legislation requiring public employers to develop and implement programs to prevent and minimize workplace violence and help ensure the safety of public employees. While workplace violence can occur in any workplace setting, typical examples of employment situations that may pose higher risks include:

  • Duties that involve the exchange of money
  • Delivery of passengers, goods, or services
  • Duties that involve mobile workplace assignments
  • Working with unstable or volatile persons in health care, social service, or criminal justice settings
  • Working alone or in small numbers
  • Working late at night or during early morning hours
  • Working in high-crime areas
  • Duties that involve guarding valuable property or possessions
  • Working in community-based settings
  • Working in a location with uncontrolled public access to the workplace

When examining the circumstances associated with workplace assaults in New York, acts of workplace violence events include four major types. However, workplaces may be subject to more than one type.

Type 1 Violence

“Type 1 Violence” means workplace violence committed by a person who has no legitimate business at the worksite and includes violent acts by anyone who enters the workplace or approaches workers with the intent to commit a crime.

Examples include:

  1. Retail robberies
  2. Workplaces where employees or proprietors have face-to-face contact and exchange money with the public.
  3. Robberies of delivery, taxicab, and ride-hailing drivers.
  4. Janitors/maintenance workers
  5. Threats and acts of violence directed at security guards.

Type 2 Violence

“Type 2 violence” means workplace violence directed at employees by customers, clients, patients, students, inmates, or visitors.

Examples of workplaces include:

  1. Social welfare service providers in unemployment offices, welfare eligibility offices, homeless shelters, probation offices, and child welfare agencies;
  2. Social welfare service providers while onsite and during visits at residences.
  3. Teaching, administrative, and support staff in schools where students have a history of violent behavior; and
  4. Other types of service providers, e.g., justice system personnel, customer service representatives, and delivery personnel.

Type 3 Violence

A “Type 3 violence” means workplace violence against an employee by a present or former employee, supervisor, or manager.

The primary target of a Type 3 event can be a co-employee, a supervisor, domestic partner, or manager of an individual who may be seeking revenge for what they perceive as unfair treatment at the workplace.

Type 4 Violence

“Type 4 violence” means workplace violence committed in the workplace by a person who does not work there but has or is known to have had a personal relationship with an employee.

Multiple Types of Workplace Violence Events

Some occupations and workplaces may be at risk of more than one type of workplace violence event.

For example, retail establishments at risk for Type 1 events, like convenience stores, can also be at risk for Type 3 events. A convenience store employee can be fatally injured at the workplace during a robbery (Type 1), or because of a personal dispute with a non-employee (Type 3).

  • Records of workplace violence hazard identification, evaluation, and correction, for a minimum of five years.
  • Workplace violence prevention plan training records for a minimum of one year.
  • Violence Incident Logs for a minimum of five years.
  • Records of workplace violence incident investigations for a minimum of five years.

What is required for the Violent Incident Log?  

Employers must maintain a log for every workplace violence incident, including: 

  • Date, Time, and Location of the Incident: The log must record the specific date, time, and location where each violent incident occurred. 
  • Identification of the Type of Workplace Violence: The log should classify the incident according to the types of workplace violence as defined in the bill. 
  • Detailed Description of the Incident: A comprehensive description of what occurred during the incident is required. This includes the nature of the violence and how it unfolded. 
  • Classification of the Perpetrator: Information on who committed the violence should be included. This could be a client, customer, stranger with criminal intent, coworker, supervisor, manager, partner, spouse, parent, relative, or other. 
  • Circumstances at the Time of the Incident: The log should detail the circumstances under which the incident occurred, such as whether the employee was performing usual job duties, working in poorly lit areas, working during a low staffing level, or in an unfamiliar location. 
  • Consequences of the Incident: Information on whether security or law enforcement was contacted, their response, and actions taken to protect employees from a continuing threat or from any other hazards identified as a result of the incident. 
  • Person Completing the Log: The name, job title, and the date when the log was completed by the individual recording the incident. 
  • All records of workplace violence hazard identification, evaluation, and correction, as well as training records and violent incident logs, shall be made available to employees and their authorized representatives, upon request and without cost, for examination and copying within 15 calendar days of a request.
  • All workplace violence records, including violent incident investigations shall be made available to the division upon request.
  • All personal/employee information in records must adhere to privacy and HIPPA guidelines within reports.

Public employers include:

  • State agencies
  • Fire Departments
  • Political subdivisions of the state
  • Public authorities
  • School Safety Agents of the NYPD
  • Public benefit corporations, and
  • any other governmental agency or instrumentality

An employee must first notify a supervisor, in written format, of a serious violation of the workplace violence prevention program and allow a reasonable period of time for correction. For cases involving imminent danger, the local authorities should be contacted immediately. If the matter has not been resolved, a complaint may be filed with the Department of Labor’s Division of Safety and Health PESH bureau. Valid complaints may result in a worksite inspection to determine if the employer has implemented the requirements of the Workplace Violence Prevention regulation. Employers found to be out of compliance with the requirements noted above will receive notices of violation. Note: it is important to address any violations within the agreed upon abatement period so that the employer does not risk incurring fines for failing to comply.

The Public Employee Safety & Health Bureau (PESH) has provided a number of resources to assist employers who are trying to come into compliance with the workplace violence prevention regulation. In addition, Public Employee Safety & Health has a consultation branch that is separate and apart from the enforcement branch, which provides free consultation surveys at the request of the employer. The employer can also set the scope of these surveys. Public Employee Safety & Health helps to identify the hazards present and recommends ways to correct each hazard. Public Employee Safety & Health also has consultants to help train employees and correct violations cited as a result of an enforcement inspection.

Workplace Violence Prevention Statute

All public employers are required to do the following:

  • Perform a risk evaluation of your workplace and determine the factors that place employees at risk from occupational assaults and homicide.
  • Provide its employees with information and training on the risks of occupational assaults and homicides in their workplace or workplaces at the time of their initial assignment and annually thereafter, as further described in Section 5(b) of the law and applicable regulations.
  • Establish and implement a system for employees to report incidents of workplace violence.
  • Develop and maintain a Workplace Violence Incident Report and review the report annually.

Additionally, public employers with twenty or more full-time employees must develop and implement a written Workplace Violence Prevention Program. A written policy statement describing the goals and objectives of the Program must be posted where employee notices are usually posted. The Program must be made available, upon request, to employees, the employees’ designated representatives and the Department of Labor.

The training must include the following information: the requirements of New York’s Workplace Violence Prevention Law; the risk factors the employer identified in the risk evaluation; the ways employees can protect themselves; and the specific procedures in place to protect employees. In addition, employers with 20 or more full-time permanent employees must inform their employees of the location of the written workplace violence prevention program and how to obtain a copy.

Yes, the workplace violence prevention program can be in an entirely digital format as long as every employee has access to it, for instance through a shared network or email distribution. However, it would not be permissible if, for example, the workplace violence prevention program was stored in a computer system for which only some employees were provided the log in information.

Q: A colleague was running down the hallway to catch his train and accidentally bumped into me causing me to sprain my ankle.  Would this be considered workplace violence?
A: No. Your colleague did not intentionally harm you or act aggressively.  Workplace violence must be an intentional physical assault or an act of aggressive behavior.

Q: Someone physically threatened me when I was working off-site.  Is a physical threat outside of my employer’s property still considered workplace violence?
A: Yes, workplace violence can occur at any location where a public employee performs work-related duties in the course of their employment while outside of their home. For example, a workplace could include an inspection site, a town-hall meeting site, a conference, a school bus; a field trip location; or a team sport venue among other locations.

Q: Is my employer required to include an authorized employee representative in the development of the Workplace Violence Prevention Program?
A: Yes, employers are required to allow for employee participation through an employee representative in the development and implementation of the workplace violence prevention program. Employers are also required to allow for employee participation in the evaluation of the physical workplace and the annual review of workplace violence incidents report.

Q: I submitted a workplace violence incident report. Is my employer required to inform me of the results of the investigation into the workplace violence incident?
A:  Employers are not required by the Workplace Violence Prevention Law to share this information but may choose to provide follow up information in accordance with applicable policies, regulations and laws.

Q: I was the victim of workplace violence and do not want my name listed in the workplace violence incidents report.  Can I ask for my name to be omitted from the workplace violence incidents report?
A: Yes. Any employee who was the victim of an incident of workplace violence can request that their name to be removed from the workplace violence incidents report. The employer must write “Privacy Concern Case” in place of the employee’s name before sharing the workplace violence incidents report with anyone other than the Department of Labor, unless required by law.

Q: I informed my supervisor of a serious violation of my employer’s workplace violence prevention program but my employer still has not fixed the violation.  What should I do?
A:  If you have informed your supervisor of a serious violation and your employer doesn’t fix the violation after a reasonable opportunity has passed, you can request a workplace inspection by filing a complaint with the Public Employee Safety and Health (PESH) bureau at the Department of Labor’s Division of Safety and Health directly using the complaint form linked here or by calling 1-844-SAFE-NYS.

Q: As an employee representative, can I report a violation of the workplace violence prevention program on behalf of an employee?
A: Yes. You, as an employee representative, can file a complaint on behalf of an employee.

Q: I have alerted my supervisor to a serious violation of the workplace violence prevention program. What is considered to a “reasonable opportunity” for my employer to fix the violation?
A: A reasonable opportunity is the amount of time it should reasonably take for the employer to investigate and fix the violation once they have been alerted to it and determined that a serious violation exists.

Q: I believe a fellow employee is in imminent danger of workplace violence however I don’t believe my supervisor will do anything to correct the activity endangering them.  Can I report the violation to the Department of Labor without informing my supervisor?
A: Yes. The Workplace Violence Prevention Law states that employees are not required to inform their supervisor when a specific employee or patient is in imminent danger, and they believe in good faith that informing their supervisor will not result in action to correct the cause of imminent danger. In cases like this, employees can report the violation to the Public Employee Safety and Health (PESH) bureau at the Department of Labor’s Division of Safety and Health directly using the complaint form linked here or by calling 1-844-SAFE-NYS.  If an employee is in immediate danger you should consider contacting local law enforcement for an immediate response.

Q: How do I report a violation of the workplace violence prevention program to the Department of Labor?
A: Violations of the workplace violence prevention law can be reported to the Public Employee Safety and Health (PESH) bureau at the Department of Labor’s Division of Safety and Health directly using the complaint form linked here or by calling 1-844-SAFE-NYS.  You can also contact the PESH bureau to ask questions about safety and health standards by calling 1-844-SAFE-NYS or emailing ask.shnypesh@labor.ny.gov

Q: A violent incident occurred at my workplace, so my employer must not be following the law. How does the PESH enforcement process address this?
A: A workplace violence prevention program should help in the prevention of workplace violence, but unfortunately, it cannot always anticipate all potential hazards to employees. The possibility of a violent incident might exist despite an employer’s best efforts. Following any incidence of violence, you should follow your workplace’s violence prevention program’s procedure for reporting the incident to your supervisor. You may request a PESH inspection for serious violations of the workplace violence prevention program after informing your supervisor and allowing your employer a reasonable opportunity to correct the violation. If your employer does not have a workplace prevention program in place, you should request a PESH inspection.
A PESH inspector will investigate your employer’s compliance with the Workplace Violence Prevention law, including policy statement, risk evaluation and determination, written program, training, and recording of incidents. The inspector will also check that employee representatives had the opportunity to participate in the evaluation of the workplace, development of the written program (for employers with 20 or more full time permanent employees), and review of WPV incident reports at least annually. If violations of the regulation are found, PESH will issue citations to your employer.

Q: What situations in the workplace might place my employees at risk of workplace violence?
A: The factors that place employees at risk will be specific to your workplace.  Common factors which might place your employees at risk include: working in public settings; working late night or early morning hours; exchanging money with the public; working alone or in small numbers; working in a location where public access to the workplace is uncontrolled; or working in areas with previous security problems.

Q: Are aggressive actions or behaviors by students, clients, or patients, especially those who may be minors, have a developmental disability or  are experiencing a crisis, considered to be workplace violence?
A: Yes, workplace violence may originate from many sources. In the workplace violence prevention program, employers are responsible for developing procedures for preventing and responding to the incidents that are likely to occur in their workplace.  This may include engaging with mental health professionals, emergency services and law enforcement, crisis intervention services or, in the case of minors, parents or guardians.

Q: How often must employers provide workplace violence prevention training to employees?
A: Training and information on the risk of workplace violence must be provided when an employee is initially assigned to a workplace and at least once a year after that.  In addition, whenever significant changes are made to the workplace violence prevention program, the employer must inform the employees who are impacted.

Q: How often must employers review the workplace violence incidents report?
A: The employer, with participation of an authorized representative, must review the workplace violence incidents report at least once a year to identify trends in the types of workplace incidents that have occurred and evaluate how effective any actions the employer has taken have been at preventing or reducing the risk of workplace violence. The results of this review should be incorporated into the workplace violence prevention program and employee training.

Q: Does the evaluation of the physical environment have to be done annually?
A: No. Only the evaluation of the workplace violence incidents report and employee training must be completed annually. Employers are encouraged to evaluate physical workplaces when facilities are changed and on a regular basis to assess the functionality of equipment, such as locks and security cameras.

Q: The workplace I manage is developing a pattern of violent incidents involving criminal conduct against employees.  What am I required to do to protect my employees?
A: As the employer, you must engage with law enforcement to report violent crimes so that they may be investigated and appropriately prosecuted. Employers must also provide employees with information on how to engage with law enforcement as well as contact information for any employee who wishes to file a criminal complaint after a workplace violence incident.

Q: I manage three workplaces in different locations. Does each work location need its own workplace violence prevention program, or can I use one program for all locations?
A: A single workplace prevention program can be used across the different work locations managed by an employer. However, a separate risk evaluation for each workplace location is required.  The risk factors for each workplace location and the safeguards implemented to address them must be listed in the workplace violence prevention program. If there are different risk factors for the three workplaces you manage, the program must contain specific information on the identified risk factors and safeguards implemented for each site.

Q: Can workplace violence incident reports be filled out and kept digitally rather than as a physical paper copy?
A: Yes. The regulations specify the workplace violence incident report can be in any format, including digital. Employers can decide which method of record keeping works best for them.

Q: I am a small public employer with only 15 employees. Am I required to develop and implement a written workplace violence prevention program?
A: No. Only public employers with 20 or more full-time permanent employees are required to develop and implement a written workplace violence prevention program. All employers, regardless of size, are encouraged to use the workplace violence prevention program template provided by NYSDOL available here: https://dol.ny.gov/wpv-program-general-template-attachment.

Q: My workplace already has a reporting system for employees to report incidents involving injuries and violence.  As an employer, must I develop a new reporting system to comply with the workplace prevention law?
A: No. The law doesn’t require an additional or separate reporting system as long as the current system can record or can be modified to record the following information about each workplace violence incident:

  • The location where the incident occurred.
  • The time of day or shift when the incident occurred.
  • A detailed description of the incident, including events leading up to the incident and how the incident ended.
  • The names and job titles of all employees involved (unless privacy is a concern).
  • The name or another method of identifying other individuals involved.
  • The nature and extent of the injuries arising from the incident.
  • The name of witnesses.

Q: What does the workplace violence risk evaluation have to include?
A: The risk evaluation must include: an examination of any records of workplace violence incidents throughout the previous year; an assessment of any relevant policies, work practices, and work procedures that may impact employee’s risk of workplace violence; and an evaluation of the physical workplace to determine what factors are present that could put employees at risk of workplace violence.

Q: What must be included in a workplace violence prevention program?
A: The workplace violence prevention program must include:

  • the list of workplace violence risk factors identified in the risk evaluation.
  • the safeguards you as an employer will use to reduce or eliminate the risk of workplace violence. For each risk factor identified in the risk evaluation you must implement a safeguard to reduce the risk of violence to employees.
  • a ranking of the safeguards your workplace violence prevention program will use to reduce the risk of workplace violence from most effective to least effective.
  • an outline or lesson plan for employee training on workplace violence.
  • a description of your workplace violence reporting system.
  • a plan to review workplace violence incidents report annually.
  • a description of how information will be kept confidential for security reasons.

Q: Should workplace violence incidents that cause a work-related death or injury also be reported on the PESH Log of Injuries and Illnesses (SH-900)?
A: Yes. Workplace violence incidents that cause a work-related death or an injury that meets the recording criteria of the PESH log of injuries and illnesses should be recorded on both the PESH log and the workplace violence incidents report. For more on the PESH log of injuries and illness, visit the PESH website linked here: https://dol.ny.gov/public-employee-safety-health

Q: What types of safeguards can I, as an employer, implement to eliminate or reduce the risk of workplace violence to my employees?
A: The safeguards implemented by an employer will depend on the type of risks present in your workplace.  As an employer, you could implement physical changes to the workplace to reduce or eliminate the risk of workplace violence. You could also change work practices to reduce the likelihood of violent incidents and to better protect staff and others should a violent incident occur. You could supply employees with personal protective equipment as well.
Examples of physical changes include: improving lighting in outdoor areas for better visibility; controlling access to certain areas with locked doors; or installing security technologies such as metal detectors, surveillance cameras, or panic buttons. Examples of changes to work practices include: implementing procedures and/or itineraries to account for employees who work alone; training staff in de-escalation techniques; or making sure all employees have methods to communicate like cell phones or panic buttons.  Examples of personal protective equipment include supplying law enforcement personnel with body armor or supplying healthcare workers with bite-resistant sleeves.

Q: Am I required to have employees participate in the development and implementation of the workplace violence prevention program?
A: Yes, as an employer you must solicit input on situations in the workplace that pose a threat of workplace violence from your employees’ authorized representative.  In addition, you must solicit input on the workplace violence prevention program you intend to implement from the authorized employee representative. You must also allow for employee participation in the annual review of the workplace violence incident report and the evaluation of the physical workplace.

Q: As an employer, do I have to inform the employee that submitted a workplace violence incident report of the results of the investigation into the workplace violence incident?
A:  Employers aren’t required by the Workplace Violence Prevention Law to share this information but may choose to provide follow up information in accordance with applicable policies, regulations and laws.

Q: An employee was injured in a sexual assault in the workplace and I am concerned for their privacy.   Can I keep their name out of the workplace violence incidents report?
A: Yes. The law states that an injury or illness resulting from sexual assault is considered a privacy concern case.  In these cases, the employer must remove the names of employees who were victims of workplace violence and write “Privacy Concern Case” in its’ place before sharing the workplace violence incidents report with anyone except the Department of Labor.  Incidents involving the following injuries or illnesses should also be treated as privacy concern cases: an injury or illness to an intimate body part or the reproductive system; mental illness; HIV infection; and needle stick injuries and cuts from sharp objects that are or may be contaminated with another person’s blood.

Q: What is considered a “reasonable opportunity” for me as an employer to fix a violation reported by an employee?
A: A reasonable opportunity is the amount of time it should reasonably take for you as the employer to investigate and fix the violation once they have been alerted to it and determined that a serious violation exists.

ADDITIONAL INSIGHT

Workplace Violence Prevention in General Industries

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), workplace violence is the second leading cause of fatal occupational injuries in the United States, affecting nearly 2 million American workers annually.

Safety Talk

Avoid Workplace Violence

Avoid Workplace Violence

Workplace violence can happen to anyone, even you. While certain occupations put a person at a much higher risk – driving a taxi, or working on the late shift for instance – violence can occur in any setting.

MORE…

Safety Talk

How You Can Prevent Violence in Your Workplace

How You Can Prevent Violence in Your Workplace

Workplace violence can happen anywhere, any time. It can come from a co-worker or a stranger. And it isn’t limited to physical assault. Workplace violence is any form of threatening or disruptive behavior. It can be as simple as a gesture, such as a raised fist, or as complicated as sabotage.

MORE…

Safety Talk

Four Categories of Workplace Violence and Prevention Strategies

Four Categories of Workplace Violence and Prevention Strategies

There are four generally agreed upon categories of workplace violence. Once you know what the categories of violence are you and your employer can practice ways to protect you, co-workers, and the public from harm.

MORE…

Safety Talk

The Front Line Of Workplace Security

The Front Line Of Workplace Security

Front desk workers have the job of greeting and directing workplace visitors. Their courteous manner and prompt service are important to the company’s public image and reputation with customers. These workers also have an important part to play in the security and safety of their company and fellow workers.

MORE…

Safety Talk

Turn the Heat Down on Conflict Before it Boils Over

Turn the Heat Down on Conflict Before it Boils Over

In our fast-paced world, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and frustrated, especially at work. Your co-workers likely feel the same, so it’s no surprise that the workplace can be a prime place for conflict.

MORE…

eLearning

Violence and Aggression at Work

Violence and Aggression at Work

This course will cover the types of violence at work and strategies on how to prevent them. It will also cover potential indicators of workplace violence and aggression and the negative effects that violence and aggression can have in the workplace.

MORE…

eLearning

Managing Conflict with a Coworker

Managing Conflict with a Coworker

This course focuses on ways to constructively resolve conflict with a coworker. It includes what causes workplace conflict, types of conflict and how to resolve conflict.

MORE…

eLearning

Conflict Resolution

Conflict Resolution

This course will provide you with the knowledge to recognize causes of workplace conflict, how to facilitate resolution of conflict and how to manage the work relationships once the conflict has been resolved.

MORE…

NY COURSE

This course will cover general risk factors for violence at work and for your own workplace and type of work you do, the four main types of workplace violence, how to identify and respond to early warning signs of potentially violent behavior or violent situations and how to recall ways to manage a hostile or violent person or situation.

This course will cover general risk factors for violence at work and for your own workplace and type of work you do, the four main types of workplace violence, how to identify and respond to early warning signs of potentially violent behavior or violent situations and how to recall ways to manage a hostile or violent person or situation.

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, workplace violence is the second leading cause of fatal workplace injuries in the United States, affecting almost 2 million American workers every year. This course will cover general risk factors for violence at work and for your own workplace and type of work you do, the four main types of workplace violence, how to identify and respond to early warning signs of potentially violent behavior or violent situations and how to recall ways to manage a hostile or violent person or situation.​

ASSIGN COURSE

DE-ESCALATION TECHNIQUES

Learning to de-escalate conflicts is crucial for preventing potentially dangerous situations from escalating.

Learning to de-escalate conflicts is crucial for preventing potentially dangerous situations from escalating.

Learning to de-escalate conflicts is crucial for preventing potentially dangerous situations from escalating. The fact of the matter is that Workplace violence can have severe consequences, including physical harm, psychological trauma, and negative impacts on workplace morale and productivity. ​This course will cover how to effectively manage and resolve conflicts before they escalate, you can contribute to a safer, more secure work environment.

ASSIGN COURSE

THE IMPORTANCE OF EMPLOYEE TRAINING IN WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION

Every year, thousands of Americans become victims of workplace violence. Homicides and non-fatal intentional injuries affect businesses in all industry sectors and their employees. Workplace violence not only disrupts the country’s economy, but it jeopardizes the health of entire families.

How Workplace Violence Impacts American Enterprises

Strong employee training and violence prevention programs can help minimize the occurrence of violent incidents on the premises of American businesses. Companies benefit by avoiding disruption and loss of earnings in the short term. In the long term, workplace violence prevention training can help build a stronger, more supportive company culture….
MORE

ELEARNING

Workplace Violence Awareness and Prevention

Workplace Violence Awareness and Prevention

OSHA has defined workplace violence as violence or the threat of physical violence against workers. Workplace violence can occur at the workplace or anywhere a job takes an individual, and can also range from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and murder. Perhaps obviously, Active Shooter events are categorized as workplace violence.

In some cases, domestic abuse creeps into the workplace, or a disgruntled current or former employees with an agenda. In other cases, heated arguments between colleagues turn violent, or customers threaten and physically intimidate workers. Workplace violence also includes acts of aggression such as stalking, brandishing a weapon on company property, or behavior that indicates lack of respect and worth of an individual (i.e. verbal abuse, bullying, harassment, and emotional abuse). For every job, workplace violence is different, but there are common standards for deterring incidents of violence at work.

MORE

ELEARNING

Active Shooter Response

Active Shooter Response

Active shooters are people engaged in killing or attempting to kill people with firearms. Situations involving active shooters are unpredictable and evolve quickly.

If it wasn’t already apparent from the news, the threat of indiscriminate gun violence hasn’t diminished. It’s important now more than ever for active shooter preparedness training efforts to escalate across the country.

MORE

USEFUL LINKS